How To Join FK Leotar Youth Academy

In this post “How To Join FK Leotar Youth Academy”, you’ll get to know the entry requirement for FK Leotar Academy, FK Leotar FC, FK Leotar FC league, and how to join FK Leotar Academy and lots more.

FK Leotar Youth Academy

FK Leotar Youth Academy

FK Leotar’s Youth Wing is in dedication to developing the future crop of professionals. To train the kids, the club spends a lot of money on recruiting experienced coaches, fitness specialists, instructors, and other sports scholars.

FK Leotar Academy is a private school in Leotar, Greece. The development league allows players to hone their abilities in preparation for professional football. The club keeps in touch with other clubs that have similar interests in purchasing young players who have shown promise in the developmental phase. More teenagers join the FK Leotar youth Program through public tryouts.

How to enroll in the FK Leotar football academy in Bosnia and Herzegovina for under 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, and 21 years old.

How to Become a Member of FK Leotar Football Academy

Everyone is welcome at the Club, which operates on an open-door basis. The procedure outline below can also use to learn how to enroll in a football school in Europe or Bosnia and Herzegovina. A large amount of the prerequisites are also available in Europe/Bosnia through Football Academy Scholarships.

FK Leotar FC Junior Camp accepts children as young as eight years old. To learn more about the many options offered, go to https://www.fkleotar.ba//academias.

Enrollment Details for FK Leotar Football Academy

FK Leotar Academy Recruits and Public Football tryouts are familiar to recruit new members. Candidates, particularly foreign ones, can still enroll via the club’s website or by special drafts.

  • Give detailed information about yourself, your past clubs (if any), and your contact information.
  • Permission from parents, particularly if the child is under the age of 18.
  • Take the opportunity to upload a video of yourself; this option is mostly for foreign candidates.

FK Leotar Football Academy Registration

To register and learn more, go to the authorized Academy website at https://www.fkleotar.ba//academias.

For future developments on Football Academies in Europe/Bosnia, sign up for our SOCCERSPEN Newsletter.

About Leotar FK

FK Leotar (Serbian Cyrillic: еотаp), also known as Leotar Trebinje or just Leotar, is a reputable football club headquarters in Trebinje, Bosnia and Herzegovina’s southernmost city. The Stadion Police seats 8,550 people.

They presently compete in Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Premier League, the country’s first-tier tournament.

Following the 1992–95 Bosnian War, Leotar was a part of the First League of the Republika Srpska, earning its last season before the merger in the 2001–02 season. Leotar won its sole national championship. And advanced for the UEFA Champions League in its debut season in Bosnia & Herzegovina’s Premier League.

Background

Yugoslavia

The club, which was established in 1925 in the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats, and Slovenes, functioned as a practice field for several footballers who went on to have successful lives in other countries.

Leotar was never promoted to the First League of Yugoslavia.

Bosnia & Herzegovina

In 1995–96, Leotar competed in the first season of the Republika Srpska First League, finishing last in the Eastern Group and missing out on the play-offs. Leotar achieved the Republika Srpska’s last league cup in 2001–02 before the entity’s clubs were incorporated into a national league. In its debut season in the national league, Leotar won the championship for the initial and only season in Bosnia and Herzegovina, depriving eljezniar Sarajevo of a third straight victory by scoring 85 pts to their 82. The following season, the team finished 4th. Leotar competed in the 2003–04 UEFA Champions League qualifying phases the next season. The club beat Luxembourg’s Grevenmacher in the first playoff round. However, lost to Czech club Slavia Prague 1–2 at home and 2–1 on the road in the second.

Award

Local

League
• Premier League of Bosnia and Herzegovina:
o Champions (1): 2002–03
• First League of the Republika Srpska:
o Champions (1): 2001–02
• Second League of the Republika Srpska:
o Champions (1): 2019–20 (east)

Cups

• Republika Srpska Cup:
o Winners (3): 2002, 2004, 2021

The Republika Srpska’s First League

The Republika Srpska First League (Serbo-Croatian: Prva Liga Republike Srpske / рва лиа eулике рске) in Bosnia and Herzegovina’s second-tier football league.

The league champion is advanced to Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Premier League. Demoted teams are demoted to Republika Srpska’s Second League, based on how many are demoted.

Background

Independent and second-tier leagues

The “First League of the Republika Srpska” was the premier level in the Republika Srpska before 2002. because the country had 3 distinct football tournaments based on an ethnic basis. UEFA, on the other hand, did not acknowledge the League’s champions. The leading clubs from the Republika Srpska adopted the Bosnia and Herzegovina Premier League in 2002, and the First League was retained as one of two second-tier divisions. The Football Association of Republika Srpska still runs it, and the federal boycott of Bosnian football has ceased.

Advancement and new structure

In the 2014–15 season, the league switched to a two-stage structure, with the regular season and playoffs. During the regular season, each of the First League’s 12 teams features each other once, for a count of 22 games. From April through May, a playoff round is held. The point system in the title playoff is the same as in the usual season. With the exception that each club starts with half of their regular-season points, rounded up to the next integer. In the event of a tie, the points earned by rounding are removed. The Belgian First Division A and the Polish Ekstraklasa both use identical schemes.

Teams rated 7 to 12 following the regular season join the demotion playoffs, with the first-placed team winning the First League. Each squad has one game against its rival. At the close of the season, the League champion gets advanced to the Premier League

while the lowest clubs are demoted to Republika Srpska’s Second League (third level). The total of demoted teams is determined by the total count of clubs that join the league. The champions of the two third-level league groups, the elimination play-off champion, and Republika Srpska clubs demoted from the Premier League are all included. As a result, 2, 3, or even 4 clubs may be demoted at any given moment.

The league will be boosted from Ten to Sixteen teams in the 2020–21 season, as announced on June 12, 2020.

Bosnia & Herzegovina’s Premier League

The Premier League of Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnian: m: tel Premijer Liga Bosne I Hercegovine / м:тeл ремиер лиа осне и ереовине), as well recognized as Liga 12, is Bosnia and Herzegovina’s top-level football league. It is run by the Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina. The league, which is the country’s most prominent football match, transformed its structure in the 2016–17 season. And is now competed by twelve clubs, with the bottom 2 teams demoted at the close of each season.

Since the 2021–22 season, the League is featured in European play by 4 clubs. The champion of the Premier League advances to the first qualification round of the UEFA Champions League. The UEFA Europa Conference League begins with the champion of the Bosnia and Herzegovina Football Cup. And also the runner-up and third-placed teams, the standings, in the first qualifier phase.

The bottom 2 teams are demoted at the close of the season. Whereas the champions of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina’s First League and the First League of the Republika Srpska are advanced to Bosnia and Herzegovina’s Premier League.

Background

Wartime (1992 — 1996)

Bosnia and Herzegovina clubs abandoned the Yugoslav First League, which faded away upon the 1991–92 season. Following the split of Yugoslavia and the declaration of freedom in late January 1992. N/FSBiH sought FIFA and UEFA admission in April of the same year.

In the meantime, the 1992–93 season was canceled because of the commencement of the Bosnian War in April 1992. Late in 1993, certain areas of the country re-started football tournaments with smaller field sizes. However, football, like the country, was separated across racial lines.

In 1993, Bosnian Croats founded the Herzegovina Football Federation and the Herzegovina First League. n which only Croatian clubs contested on a local level across West Herzegovina and a few additional enclaves. Bosnian Serbs formed their independent First League of the Republika Srpska in the same year, in territory controlled by the Republika Srpska state at the time. Besides a short tournament for the season 1994–95 (earned by Celik Zenica), football in a region under the supervision of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina entities and auspices of N/FSBiH, at the moment subsequently with Bosniak predominance, came to a halt. The tournament under the aegis of the N/FSBiH did not return until the 1995–96 season when the Bosnia and Herzegovina First League was established.

After Wartime (1996 and 2000)

Until 1998 and 2000, these 3 independent football leagues operated in Bosnia & Herzegovina. Since FIFA and UEFA only supported associations that operated under the auspices of formal and globally accepted governmental institutions during the conflict and before the signing of the Dayton Peace Agreement, they supported the union of the 3 organizations as N/FSBiH. This was also a result of FIFA’s resolution to identify N/FSBiH in July 1996. Whereas UEFA welcomed N/FSBiH as an adjacent member in the same year until 1998, when it was granted complete membership. Only N/FSBiH clubs and the national team were allowed to participate on a global and professional stage.

Numerous steps have preceded the final unification. Initially, a playoff was established in which clubs competed for the title of a champion under the supervision of the N/FSBiH. The notion was that a playoff under unified N/FSBiH auspices would bring together clubs contending under 3 independent organizations for the 1st moment. However, this was turned down by the Serb association, permitting clubs from the Croat football association and N/FSBiH to participate in the playoffs for the seasons 1997–98 and 1999–00. Whereas the 1998–99 playoff was stopped due to Croat’s association’s doubt on which stadiums tournaments should be featured. The playoffs for the following season were continued for the final round until the complete and ultimate deal on the merged N/FSBiH and its contest, the Premier League BiH (Premijer Liga), was reached in the fall of 2000.

The Premier League formation (2000–01)

In the fall of 2000, a complete and ultimate deal on a fully integrated N/FSBiH and its tournament, the Premier League BiH (Premijer Liga), was reached.

However, during the first 2000–01 season, clubs from the Federation of BiH competed in a distinct division, whereas clubs from the Republic of Srpska entity competed in their own league because their entity-body declined to join the unified N/FSBiH and its new tournament. UEFA and FIFA, on the other hand, never planned to approve this distinct organization or its tournament, which meant clubs couldn’t participate outside of the entity’s borders and couldn’t participate worldwide. This predicament compelled clubs to demand that their organizations join N/FSBiH as well, and they did so 2 years afterwards for the 2002–03 season. Premier League has been the top flight in Bosnia and Herzegovina football since 2000, with two entity-based divisions, First League of Republika Srpska and First League of the Federation of BiH, being relegated to the 2nd division and serving as feeder leagues to Premier League.

2016–17 to 2018–19, the Premier League was known as Liga 12

The BH Telecom Premier League changed its system completely between the 2016–17 and 2017–18 seasons, cutting the number of clubs from Sixteen to 12, and adopting playoffs (occasionally dubbed as “title playoffs”) and play-outs. Each club contested a certain number of games during the regular season, following which they advanced to the play-offs or played out, depending on their place. The top six clubs in the regular season competed in the playoffs, with each club facing off two times for the title, which secures Champions League participation, and 2nd and 3rd position, which ensures Europa League qualifier slots. 6 clubs competed in the play-offs to prevent demotion, with the last 2 teams being demoted.

2018–19, the old style was used

From the 2018–19 season, the league has not been played as it had been the previous two seasons. Indeed, it’s quite straightforward; then again, the 12 clubs face one another twice, once at home and once away, and 3 times, according to how the roster is designed. The league season will now consist of 33 full rounds rather than the previous 22 rounds. Plus an extra 10 rounds in the elimination and championship matches.

Funding

The Football Association of Bosnia and Herzegovina inked a two-year funding contract with BH Telecom on July 31, 2012. Thereby rebranding the competition the BH Telecom Premier League.

Prior to the actual commencement of the 2014–15 season, the contract was renewed. Mtel was named as the new league sponsor for the following 3 years on July 24, 2020, for an estimated 23 million BAM. Rebranding the league m: tel Premier League.

First League of Yugoslavia

The Yugoslav First Federal Football League (Serbian: рвa савена лиа у удалу / Prva savezna liga u fudbalu; Croatian: Prva savezna liga u nogometu; Slovene: Prva zvezna nogometna liga; Macedonian: рва соуна лиа; Albanian: Liga e par federale) was

The First League Championship was one of 2 yearly national events in Yugoslavia, the other would be the Yugoslav Cup.

In 1967, the league became entirely professional. Notwithstanding the succession and the similar name “Prva savezna liga,” the UEFA-recognized replacement league to the Yugoslav First League. The First League of FR Yugoslavia, is discussed in a different piece.

Yugoslavia (1923–1940)

This was the inaugural national club tournament for clubs from the Kingdom of Yugoslavia (called the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes until 1930). The league began in 1923 with a cup competition structure for the first 4 seasons. Before switching to a round-robin style in 1927. From 1927 to 1940, 17 seasons were concluded, with all of the titles earned by Croatian (Graanski Zagreb, Concordia Zagreb, HAK Zagreb, and Hajduk Split) or Serbian clubs (Graanski Zagreb, Concordia Zagreb, HAK Zagreb, and Hajduk Split) (BSK Belgrade and Jugoslavija Belgrade).

It was regulated at initially by the Croatian-named Nogometni Savez Jugoslavije (Football Association of Yugoslavia), which was created in April 1919 in Zagreb, until late 1929, when the Zagreb and Belgrade parts of the association clashed. As a result, the association’s head office was relocated to Belgrade in May 1930, where it was given the Serbian identity Fudbalski Savez Jugoslavije and kept going to operate the league until World War II broke out.

As a result of the relocation, Croatian coaches and players deserted the Yugoslav national team. Following the takeover of Yugoslavia by the Axis powers, independent Croatian and Serbian leagues were formed, which functioned during World War II.

Succeeding Leagues

Slovenia and Croatia Leaves

Slovenia announced freedom in June 1991, and Croatia fell into line in October of that year. As a result of their separation from the Football Association of Yugoslavia, they each established their separate football leagues. The Slovenian PrvaLiga began to play in late 1991, and the Croatian Prva HNL began to play in 1992. Due to the prolonged conflict in Croatia, the season was only held for one schedule year, from Feb to June 1992. Since then, both leagues have been active.

Season 1991–92

So although Slovenian and Croatian clubs had previously left the tournament to participate in their own leagues, the 1991–92 season was the final season staged formally under the banner of SFR Yugoslavia. The contest was played by clubs from the leftover 4 federative units However since the Bosnian War burst out near the close of the season, Bosnian clubs never completed it, with eljezniar of Sarajevo only managing to play 17 of the 33 slated matches, and Sloboda Tuzla and Vele Mostar finishing a few leagues matches short of finalizing the season. Nonetheless, Crvena Zvezda of Belgrade is acknowledged for earning the final Yugoslav First League championship. Because most of the matches were conducted as scheduled.

Macedonia and the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

Since the new Macedonian First League was formed the subsequent season, Macedonian clubs left the tournament just after 1991–92 season.

Apart from Borac of Banja Luka (the greatest Bosnian Serb side at the moment), Bosnian clubs were all on hiatus for the 1992–93 season due to full-fledged battle that erupted there, excluding Borac of Banja Luka, which momentarily relocated to Belgrade and merged the recently created league comprising clubs from Serbia and Montenegro, renamed the First League of FR Yugoslavia. (Following the other 4 member republics gained freedom, Serbia and Montenegro dubbed their country the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia.) The league was known as that till the 2002–03 season, when the country was rebranded Serbia and Montenegro, and the league was rebranded First League of Serbia and Montenegro.

Finally, in June 2006, Montenegro gained freedom and quietly left the union. And Montenegro commenced running an independent top-flight football league regulated by its football organization from the 2006–07 season forward. Serbia, on the other hand, received the continuation of the country’s league, which was founded as Prva Liga (First League) in 1992 and rebranded and relaunched as Superliga in summer 2005 as the legitimate successor to the Serbia-Montenegro state union.

Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Bosnia and Herzegovina declared freedom in late winter 1992, and the N/FSBiH petitioned for FIFA and UEFA membership in April of that year. In the meantime, the 1992–93 season was canceled due to the commencement of the Bosnian War in April 1992. Late in 1993, various areas of the country revived football tournaments with a smaller field size. However, football, like the country, was separated along racial lines.

Only Croatian clubs participated on a parochial level within the confines of West Herzegovina and a few minor enclaves in the First League of Herzegovina, which was founded in 1993 by Bosnian Croats. Bosnian Serbs formed their own First League of the Republika Srpska in the same year, in an area controlled by the Republika Srpska state at the moment. Other than a short tournament for the season 1994–95 (earned by elik Zenica), football in a region under the jurisdiction of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina agencies and auspices of N/FSBiH, at the moment subsequently with Bosniak majority, came to a halt. Tournament under the aegis of the N/FSBiH did not return until the 1995–96 season, when the Bosnia and Herzegovina First League was established.

Until 1998 and 2000, these three independent football leagues operated in Bosnia & Herzegovina. Since FIFA and UEFA only supported associations that operated under the auspices of formal and globally recognized governmental institutions during the conflict. And before the signing of the Dayton Peace Agreement, they endorsed the union of the 3 organizations as N/FSBiH.

This was also a result of FIFA’s resolution to accept N/FSBiH in July 1996. Whereas UEFA welcomed N/FSBiH as an adjacent participant in the same year until 1998, when it was granted complete admission. Only N/FSBiH clubs and the national team were allowed to participate on a global and legal level.

Many steps have preceded the final merger. Initially, a playoff was established in which clubs competed for the title of a champion under the supervision of the N/FSBiH. The idea was that a playoff under unified N/FSBiH auspices would bring together clubs contending under 3 independent organizations for the first time. However this was turned down by the Serb association. Hence permitting clubs from Croat football association and N/FSBiH to participate in the playoffs for the seasons 1997–98 and 1999–00. Whereas the 1998–99 playoff was dropped due to Croat’s association’s doubt on which stadiums tournaments should be performed.

The playoffs for the following season were continued for the final time until the full & complete deal on the merged N/FSBiH and its tournament, the Premier League BiH (Premijer Liga), was reached in the fall of 2000. But, during the first 2000–01 season, clubs from the Federation of BiH competed in a distinct league. whereas clubs from the Republic of Srpska entity competed in their own league because their entity-body declined to enter the merged N/FSBiH and its new tournament.

Whereas UEFA and FIFA, on the other hand, never planned to accept this distinct organization or its tournament. Which meant clubs could not participate outside of the entity’s jurisdiction and no international football would be played. This predicament compelled clubs to demand that their organizations join N/FSBiH as well. And they did so 2 years afterwards for the 2002–03 season. Premier League has been the top flight in Bosnia and Herzegovina football since 2000. 2 entity-based leagues, First League of Republika Srpska and First League of the Federation of BiH, were relegated to the second division and served as feeder leagues to Premier League.

Apply here; https://www.fkleotar.ba//academias

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